Why Put Up With Pain?

New patients are welcome. Click here for a comprehensive list of all our podiatric medicine and surgery specialties.


Heel Pain

Neuropathy

Diabetic Foot

Laser Therapy

EPAT Machine


Testimonials

As a teacher, I am on my feet for a good portion of the day. At the end of the day, the balls of my feet felt as though I was walking on shards of hot glass. After a few Laser treatments, the sensation started to subside and my feet became much more comfortable to walk on. The pain lessens with each treatment. I am happy to say that I even walked nine holes of golf for the first time in a year

-Shirley C.

I am writing to thank you for your help over the recent months with my toe infection. I am so pleased with the results and the overall experience. It was relatively painless and there was no down-time or recovery time! Every appointment offered me significant improvement. The laser treatments were the safest and easiest medical choice for me and I am so glad I did not have to undergo surgery.

-Sharon G.

I want to thank Doctor Fosdick for the pain relief I am having. My feet feel much better. I also want to thank his staff for following up with the insurance company and getting them to pay partially for my orthotics as they initially said they would.

-Paul V.

 

Calluses


Calluses on the footA callus (or callosity) is an especially toughened area of skin which has become relatively thick and hard in response to repeated friction, pressure or other irritation. Calluses are generally not harmful, but may sometimes lead to other problems, such as skin ulceration or infection.

People with bunions may find painful calluses behind the second or third toe. These are caused by unequal pressure and rubbing on the smaller toes. Such calluses can be very painful and often do not respond to trimming of the callus, soft materials, or orthotic devices. It is not the callus that causes pain, but rather the severe imbalance in the function of the foot that is taking its toll.

Calluses develop becuase of excessive pressure at a specific area of the foot. Some common causes of callus formation are high-heeled dress shoes, shoes that are too small, obesity, abnormalities in the gait cycle (walking motion), flat feet, high arched feet, bony prominences, and the loss of the fat pad on the bottom of the foot.

People with diabetes face special skin challenges. Because diabetes affects the capillaries, the small blood vessels which feed the skin, thickening of the skin with callus increases the difficulty of supplying nutrients to the skin. The stiffness of a callus or corn, coupled with the shear and pressure that caused it, may tear the capillaries or adjoining tissue, causing bleeding within the callus or corn.

Often, bleeding within a callus is an early sign of diabetes, even before elevated blood sugars may be noticed. Although the bleeding can be small, sometimes small pools of blood or hematoma are formed. The blood itself is an irritant, a foreign body within the callus that makes the area burn or itch. If the pool of blood is exposed to the outside, infection may follow. Infection may also lead to ulceration. Luckily, this process can be prevented at several places, but such infections can become life-threatening. Diabetic foot infections are the leading cause of diabetic limb amputation.

Treatment for Calluses


We can treat your calluses by paring it down or by reducing it with keratolytic agents containing salicylic acid, or with a pumice stone

We can prescribe orthotics to relieve the excessive pressure that leads to callus formation and prevent reoccurrance.

If you suspect that your callus may be an indication of diabetes, we are here to help you.

Your feet should be pain free.

Call us for an appointment

860•349•8500 or 203•294•4977